Skip to main content

The Shoeless Mother

I saw her walking away from me while I braked my car to a stop at the intersection of Whiskey Bottom and Highway 1. Her hair - blonde and in a poneytail. Her attire - casual with a nice, tan jacket and slacks. She carried a young girl on her left side who was was blonde, too. Nothing looked out of place about what I could assume was a mother and daughter.

Across the street, on the other side of Whiskey Bottom, a man was pushing a black baby stroller. Perhaps the two were together. Perhaps the stroller was for the toddler in the woman's arms. Perhaps the stroller contained the little girl's sibling.

My gaze drifted back to the mother and daughter as the light turned green. Before I applied the gas, I saw what others may have overlooked. The woman had no left shoe, only a sock. Her right foot also had a sock but had either the remains of a shoe of some other material used to cover that foot. The material fanned out like a shredded tire as she walked with the child.

They kept walking. I drove past the pair with heavy heart.

This is the crossroads so many of us face. In a moment, we can choose to act or ignore. Sometimes, we take action. We ask a question. Offer money. Lend a hand. Other times, too often, we pass on by. Out of apathy, fear, or indifference we choose not to act.

I've done this countless times with the "corner sign man" who comes in all shapes, colors, and sizes. I presume he doesn't really need help. If he has time to stand on the street corner with a sign, he could spend time looking for a job...any job. I judge by his weathered appearance and often decent clothing that he'll use my money for booze, drugs, or sex.

By claiming that I can't help everyone who appears homeless, in reality I help no one.

Driving down the road to an Easter musical rehearsal at church, I winced at the irony of missing a ministry opportunity. Missing a rehersal is nothing in comparison to show compassion. The more I ponder about turning around to at least see where the "family" was going or what they were doing, the further away I become. Until, I dismissed the need.

Missed opportunity? Missed blessing? Missed chance to make a difference? Maybe. Maybe not. The point is we'll never know unless we act. God can certainly bring someone else along to help in a sitatuion...just as easily as some situations happen tragically for a reason. God is no less present in the tragedy than He is in the rescue.

Instead, will we be present during someone's time of need? Will we be willing to be willing?

Keep an eye out of the shoeless mothers around you and make a difference.

Popular posts from this blog

Being Intentional About Weight Loss

At the time of this post, I've lost 61 pounds, and I've accomplished this with no workout routine. I feel amazing! Want to know how I did it? Read on.

See You Around, Mike

Three weeks ago, I attended the memorial service of a dear Brother in Christ. Sunday, June 10, would've been his 56th birthday.
I miss my friend. But what's sad is that I didn't miss Mike until he was gone.

At least in the middle of the odd month, but definitely by the last week of it, Mike would always reach out to me with a request. It was usually to load a certain worship music video or some game show music. Sometimes, he needed some specific slides created or sound effects. Mike put a lot of thought into preparing the lessons.

For certain lessons, Mike asked the kids to write something that was bothering them or something that was a sin. Then he had them take hammer and nail to that card and attach it to an old rugged cross. Mike often brought in props to physically connect the Bible stories to the kids. For example, when he dressed as an innkeeper and walked in a wheelbarrow full of fresh cow manure. He was adding the smell of a barn to the lesson just to help set th…

What A Year

With a new year, looking forward and backward is important. Looking ahead is important to set goals and milestones of what to accomplish in the coming year. Reflecting on the past year is important to consider areas of growth and areas needing improvement.

Looking back on 2017, it's hard to ignore that I've been in the swamp of a layoff for half of it. December marked 6 months since the last day of work at AOL and 4 months since separation from the company.

So, what are some lessons I've learned from this journey?