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Would You Like To Sniff My Dog's Butt, Too?

I definitely don't get some folks here. Granted, the DC Metro is a stew-pot of underdone and well-seasoned personalities...but some people. Let's just say I'd sell them on eBay for human experimentations.

Case in point, you may recall we have a Beagle named Maddy. You may not know that she enjoys the cold and enjoys being outside. Of course, she's so spoiled that if she thinks she missing something better inside, she'd rather whine, bark, and/or howl her displeasure of being left outside.

While in Laurel, before we moved, Maddy was left outside for two hours. This wasn't the first time...but was the first time she barked. You also have to know that Maddy's separation anxiety can kick in and thus anything in a 30 yard radius could be chewed or dowsed in pee and/or poo...thus, she is crated while in Columbia.

A neighbor placed an anonymous note on my mother in-law's windshield. On the outside "About Your Dog..." The letter inside went on about how the person had observed Maddy being left outside while it was cold (she likes cold)...how she lifted her paw out of discomfort (she's a spoiled Beagle, she half-points no matter the temp) and that what we were doing could be considered abuse. No signature. Coward.

Fast forward to before we moved into the Columbia townhouse. Maddy is left in our fenced back yard for a couple hours and voices some displeasure. Never mind the other dogs in the neighborhood...we have Columbia's finest explain that we need to keep her quiet.

Personally, I'm certain it was our next-door Asian neighbors who seem friendly enough. At times seem to have a dozen folks in the place. Maybe they wanted Maddy for stew. ;)

I just want to ask these folks, "Would you like to sniff my dog's butt, too? Perhaps you can tell me how she feels and if you're correct, I won't pimp slap you into next week!"

It's a sad day when folks would rather write anonymous notes and call the cops instead of actually trying to talk to a person. So, your New Year's resolution here: get to know people...ask more questions...or love your animals but don't put them above people. Take one or any combination of those.

Plus, I'm sure that I'll be in mourning on Monday. I leave the old Benz with a mechanic shop for it to be tended to before going to her new owner. He plans to fully restore her, something I never could do. Here's to 2006!

Happy New Year!

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