Skip to main content

Let Them Die!

When I first learned that Maryland Senator Ben Cardin is proposing a bill to save the newspaper industry, I chuckled. Bailouts are the way of Capitol Hill these days, but this maneuver shows how out of touch Cardin is.

Sorry, Senator, everything doesn't need a bailout. History has shown that throwing money at an entity rarely is the best answer. It's the easiest response since it requires responsible parties to not work the problem. More often, the people associated with this bailout-handout become lazy and expectant of more assistance (um, welfare?). If you perceive this view as negative or jaded, just take a stroll though history and you'll trip over the facts repeatedly.


Senator Cardin, why would you want to save something that NEEDS to change? Newspapers have been at a crossroads for years along with the rest of legacy media (radio and TV). Change is needed but many organizations have tossed and turned on when and how to change. Some have adapted better than others. Sadly, some have closed their doors.

Making newspapers non-profits based on the idea that they educate the populous is worthy of thinking outside the box - slightly. However, I wouldn't want most of these liberal rags being labeled "educational" whatsoever. This effort reminds me of the grossly out-of-date instructional videos I've come across being used in classroom settings. Beyond screaming how antique the footage is, the message conveyed is that we don't have the time or resources to update this information from the 1970's.

Is this what you want for newspapers, Senator Cardin?

My guess is you just want to spare them all a visit from the Grim Reaper because newspapers are as American as apple pie and baseball. We can't let them fail!

Have you been reading the headlines?

Newspaper sales fell almost $2B in one quarter

Internet: Death of the Newspaper?


The incredible shrinking newspaper


Who killed the newspaper?


Heck, there's even a tell-tale website: Newspaper Deathwatch

I think of the TV shows where viewers created huge "save the show" campaigns. Often, the producers responded with several more episodes to these viewers delight. Yet, the end was always near because the show simply no longer had sponsors. It was no longer profitable, no matter how great the actors or stories. This even applies to newscasts. WUSA, Washington, DC's CBS affiliate, opted to replace weekend newscasts with infomercials because they brought it more money.

You may have liked those casts. Sorry. You may have liked those TV shows. You can watch reruns online or on DVD. Senator Cardin, you may want to be the Savior of the Newspapers, but it doesn't need to be done. Newspapers are failing because advertisers don't want to run ads in a medium that fewer people are looking at on a daily basis.

Let newspapers die, Senator Cardin, so our great journalists can find their next voice on the web. Or let them retire. Just focus your efforts on more modern issues, and hang up your newspaper cape and tights. No one wants to see you wear those (shudder).

Comments

  1. If you ask me, newspapers are quickly becoming a rotary phone in a voice activated phone world. The older readers are going to have the hardest time adapting. The younger readers, are already out of the paper (never really entered), and receiving RSS feeds and looking at the news online. Just like the watch, and the home phones, they are all in transition. How many folks do you know who don't wear a watch and have cut the cord on their home phones? Hmmmm food for thought.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

I Can Honestly Say Jon Is My Best Friend

At the beginning of this year, these were Kate Gosselin's words in an interview with Today's Christian Woman : "I can honestly say Jon is my best friend." Kate also says, "When the babies were born, I was well aware that our marriage could crumble. It was close to doing so at times. But we survived that first year. And then the second one. And then each year after that. Even though the issues have changed, it's never gotten easier. "But Jon and I are more determined than ever that we're in this together. We've told our kids many times that we're always going to be a family. There are no other options. Sure, Jon and I take our stress out on each other, and no, that's not always good or healthy. But we work hard as a team every day."

Separation of Church and State

The phrase "separation of church and state" has been used so frequently in the news (and perhaps I hear it more being in DC/Baltimore region), that I seriously question if anyone really understands the origins of the phrase and how it's been polluted? For many, I'll assume they think it means keeping church or religion out of all government and government supported entities. Wrong.

Politics and Religion: Knowing Little But Never Being Wrong

You may have heard the age old axiom from your parents. "Never talk about politics or religion." My guess, this was a mantra to avoid uncomfortable dinner parties 30 years ago. Hard to believe but people actually met IN PERSON to talk and catch up, instead of sitting at their computers or using their phones to text and tweet. Not bringing up the topics of politics or religion, especially when in mixed company, helped keep everything pleasant and calm. Few chances for awkward moments when talking about the weather, food, kids, and the lawn. But why are people so passionate about these topics? Why do they cause such conflict in discussions?