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Whistling In Glory

Many of us were saddened by the sudden news of Andy Griffith's passing. I have fond memories of watching the show growing up. It was a perfect show for family viewing. Entertaining. Fun. Good lessons which still resonate today. Perhaps we love this window to a simpler time in America. Perhaps we enjoy how the widower sheriff juggled life and work and always made time for Opie. When so many dads today are uninvolved or absent, Andy was the father figure that many wished they had.

He died on Roanoke Island, NC. It's only 2 hours from where I'm vacationing on Ocracroke Island. But his proximity isn't what made his passing more poignant to me. The first thing I read about his death made me smile.


"Andy was a person of incredibly strong Christian faith and was prepared for the day he would be called Home to his Lord," Mrs. Griffith said in a statement.
"He is the love of my life, my constant companion, my partner, and my best friend. I cannot imagine life without Andy, but I take comfort and strength in God's grace and in the knowledge that Andy is at peace and with God," she added.

I cannot remember reading about another celebrity's passing - nor non celeb - where their faith was so highlighted.

When Griffth was diagnosed with Guillen-Barre syndrome, a muscular disease that left him partially paralyzed for months, Griffith said in a 1996 "Guideposts" interview: "I firmly believe that in every situation, no matter how difficult, God extends grace greater than the hardship, and strength and peace of mind that can lead us to a place higher than where we were before."


Even in this debilitating pain, Griffith's faith kept things in focus and perspective.


While it might be easy to dismiss his faith as something tied to his age, a simpler upbringing or time, or a dozen other reasons...the fact is when one's faith is real, mature, and at the heart of their life - it will be their legacy.


Read more about Andy Griffith in this CBN article.

In the video clip below, what other TV show would spend time reflecting on the U.S. Constitution and our lack of being able to quote it?
 
Thank you, Andy Griffith, for your faith and wisdom.



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