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She Did Great!

Those are three little words you like hearing a surgeon say about your daughter who had her tonsils and adenoids removed this morning at 8:30.

There's something a bit scary about having your child going into surgery. Even though, she's prayed over and you have a peace that everything will be fine...there's still a little part that doesn't like the idea of your little girl being unconscious and cut on by strangers.

After the quick paperwork and a few questions, G slipped into her hospital gown and bouffant cap. We spoke with a nurse, an anesthesiologist, another nurse, the doctor, and Grammie and Poppie slipped back for well-wishes. One parent is allowed to accompany the patient. G picked me. I was pleased, yet wasn't sure how this experience was gonna play out. I was already wanting to tear up about the whole thing. Soon, I was in a gown, shoe covers, and a bouffant cap.

When it was time, I wheeled her into the operating room in a large plastic wagon. What kid could resist a wagon? Plus, one filled with books and toys? G was soon sitting on my lap and being talked to about the Bazooka bubble-gum scented sleepy gas. The nurse's technique was one of "calming distraction" as she talked on and on about the flavors she has and which ones became available which days. Meanwhile, I'm starting to smell this stuff and wondering, "I'm sure it's not that strong but should I really have my nose in the updraft of this stuff?!"
In a matter minutes, G was a limp rag on my chest and being poured on the table. I was escorted back to the waiting room. I was okay. No tears. Now, we waited but first some coffee!

About 30 minutes later, she was in recovery and soon enjoying "Lady and the Tramp" and treats of a Popsicle and juice. But what I thought was grape Popsicle juice in the corner of her mouth was blood. The operating doctor, Karl Diehn, shared that a small area of where her tonsils were had developed a blood clot. So, she had to go back into surgery to remove the clot and cauterize the area.

After all, we are talking about Georgia Kennedy Garner here...nothing is easy with this child - she does it her own way! :)
Needless to say, there was a bit of drama with G since it was apparent to her she was going back. This time, Mommy went in and since G was crying and not happy about the whole thing, Mommy cried a bit too.

Around 2:30pm, we finally got out of there...and G should sleep very well tonight after her long ordeal. We all should sleep well.

She'll get to stay home for 10 days. Kim will stay home Thursday and Friday, I'll work from home Monday and Tuesday, and Grammie and Poppie will come over Wed - Fri.

Let the days of ice cream, pudding, and chocolate milk begin!


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