Skip to main content

No Homeless In The Country

Recently, I attended work meetings in New York City. I never grow tired of the complexities of NYC. There's a lot there. Every block can be sensory overload. Local shops, artwork, construction, architecture, and frequently homeless people.

Amongst all the hustle and bustle, the refined and wealthy, and the multiple complexities are people of simple living. Barely living. You might wish to not think about the homeless, however, they're impossible to ignore even in the busyness of the city. Yet, what is most perplexing to me is the sheer number we see and the infinite number we don't see, and all of these citizens are within yards of shelter and food. It's as if our advancement as a society creates in its wake people who cannot conform or benefit from that advancement. Thus, they haven't the means to sustain a home or their families and become invisible on the cityscape.

Barely a block from a hotel, two men rest in sleeping bags. They borrow the awning of a building for overnight shelter from the rain and wind.

Meer steps from restaurants of every shape and cuisine, a man jingles coins in a cup asking for money.

Regardless of the city, these are areas of the highest concentration of people, food, shelter, and money. Yet, cities remain the highest concentration of the homeless.

Go into the country - farmland and other rural areas - where the land is plentiful, spaces are wide, and everyone is a neighbor. Finding someone homeless is nearly impossible. Is it because those without means find work and shelter more easily? Is it because they would stand out more easily? Is it because no one is homeless in the country?

Think about it. I cannot recall once during my years of visiting family in the country or miles upon miles of driving through rural areas ever seeing anymore who appeared to be homeless.

The differences between the city and the country - urban and rural - are numerous. There's more living space, business, and activities in the city. There's more scenery, comradery, and simplicity in the country.

Both Deuteronomy 15:11 and Mark 14:7 speak to the poor always being among us. It's a fact thousands of years old. Yet, I cannot help but think that in our advancement as a society we are neglecting an important characteristic: compassion. If we were more compassionate and loving, less selfish and focused on our own needs, perhaps something found more abundant in the country - community - would be found more often in our cities.

Would this remove homelessness? Perhaps not. But just as Christ indicated that widows and orphans were our responsibility - not the government and not only the Church - I can only imagine we have some responsibility in preventing people from losing their shelters.

What are your thoughts on these invisible souls?

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

I Can Honestly Say Jon Is My Best Friend

At the beginning of this year, these were Kate Gosselin's words in an interview with Today's Christian Woman : "I can honestly say Jon is my best friend." Kate also says, "When the babies were born, I was well aware that our marriage could crumble. It was close to doing so at times. But we survived that first year. And then the second one. And then each year after that. Even though the issues have changed, it's never gotten easier. "But Jon and I are more determined than ever that we're in this together. We've told our kids many times that we're always going to be a family. There are no other options. Sure, Jon and I take our stress out on each other, and no, that's not always good or healthy. But we work hard as a team every day."

Why The Hate For Jon & Kate?

This is a bit odd for me to write a post about "Jon & Kate Plus Eight." The only reason I watch the show is if Kim has Netflixed a season (we don't get TLC) and I'm relaxing with her. Kim's a fan of it and has read Kate's book. But why this post? This family lives in our neighbor-state Pennsylvania, Kim and I concluded that Jon's personality is very similar to mine, and I'm sick of all the trash about them on the web and in the blogosphere.

Palin Keeps 'em Guessin'

People lash out at things that they don't understand and at things that scare them. It's rather clear that liberals don't understand and therefore are scared of Sarah Palin. Since she came out of the proverbial woodwork of Alaska and onto the national scene of a Presidential campaign, the media has lashed out at her like hungry wolves waiting for any chance to pounce. Remember her wardrobe, for example? The media highlighted the Republican National Committee’s purchase of $150,000 in clothes for Palin, even though the dresses would be donated to charities. The story was page-one for The New York Times. Yet, Barack Obama’s trips to Hawaii on a chartered Boeing 757 cost $800,000 and received appreciative "nods" from the media. Then Presidential Candidate Obama used a Boeing 757 for two trips to Hawaii over the summer for a vacation and to visit his failing grandmother. Palin being a modest person without a wardrobe to withstand 24/7 campaigning had clothes gi