Skip to main content

Fireproof Ignites Convictions

It's not often a movie is labeled wholesome, uplifting, inspiring, and challenging. That's a very tall order for any movie to deliver. Yet, "Fireproof" satisfies that order with healthy dashes of drama, action, and comedy.

The plot is simple. Captain Caleb Holt (Kirk Cameron) is a well-trained firefighter and knows how to quickly respond to an emergency. However, he doesn't know how to communicate with his wife and doesn't know his marriage is in serious trouble until it's too late. Caleb seeks a quick fix to his wife Catherine (Erin Bethea) and their marriage by seeking some fatherly wisdom. His dad, however, offers him a challenge that will shake Caleb to his very core.

"Fireproof" goes beyond tackling how to better one's marriage by touching on internet pornography and seemingly innocent flirting...something that's touched everyone on one degree or another.

My general rule of thumb with movie prices around $10 these days: it's gotta be a blockbuster full of eye candy for me to see it in the theater. "Fireproof" is an exception because it's a rare chance to support such a rare film and a ministry. Too often Hollywood forgets that people no matter their faith will go see wholesome films. I always enjoy a movie experience where the theater applauds loudly at the end.

My advice to you is to see this movie. If you're married or thinking about ever getting married, see this movie. And see it with friends and couples you care about. Additionally, the book featured in the film is worth at least a husband going through but it's written so that a either a husband or wife can go through it.

Never leave your partner behind.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

May We Never Forget

On this 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, I'm posting below a story I wrote on the 10th anniversary. These are my reflections on that day.  Looking at the first paragraph, it's interesting how times change. No one has asked me questions of where I was or what I was doing. I'm not sure if many of us have forgotten but more likely we're so very distracted. We've navigated almost two years of a pandemic that's taken and changed so many lives. We've navigated political and cultural changes poorly and emotionally to the point of creating more divisions.  We are not the country we were the weeks and months after 9/11. The bipartisan efforts then were refreshing. The amount of American flags flying proudly and in solidarity was inspiring. Today, it seems many despise their own country and its flag. But even this is not new. While she has stumbled over the years and will continue to do so - America will always be the most amazing country in the world. It

Why The Hate For Jon & Kate?

This is a bit odd for me to write a post about "Jon & Kate Plus Eight." The only reason I watch the show is if Kim has Netflixed a season (we don't get TLC) and I'm relaxing with her. Kim's a fan of it and has read Kate's book. But why this post? This family lives in our neighbor-state Pennsylvania, Kim and I concluded that Jon's personality is very similar to mine, and I'm sick of all the trash about them on the web and in the blogosphere.

Risks Of Being Vulnerable

Being vulnerable can be so rewarding. It can also be horrifically disappointing. Stereotypically for guys, being vulnerable with thoughts and feelings is simply against a man's nature. It doesn't come naturally. Emotions are saved for when men are alone or to share only with spouses or best friends. I think of the Tom Hanks line from  A League of Their Own : "There's no crying in baseball!" Anger seems to be permitted but not fear, worry, or tears. More often I've seen people apologize for getting upset or tearing up than for showing an angry or passionate reaction.  The more reflective emotions seem to be reserved for women. It seems stereotypically more natural for women to be shedding tears or showing concern. Yet, too much or too frequent emotional displays can also bring scoffing or ridicule. It's like there's no winning when it comes to being vulnerable. This is why being vulnerable is hard and requires intentionality.  The reality is that be