Skip to main content

Lessons From Joe Friday

Dragnet was on television before I was born. Its first season aired in 1967. Since then, other reboots and a movie attempted to keep the character Joe Friday alive. For me, Joe Friday is Jack Webb. An actor and producer, Webb wanted the show to have realism and unpretentious acting. The show captured the boredom and drudgery of police work along with the danger and heroism. It also helped improve public opinion of police officers.

If we ever needed Joe Friday, we need him today. While police are stereotyped as violent, corrupt, and racial profiling, some are being senselessly murdered. It feels like a sad time for our men and women in blue.

I love the clip below from "The Big Interrogation" which aired on February 9, 1967. Almost 50 years old, the description Joe Friday gives of police, detectives, and their lives is powerful, relevant, and should instantly earn a police offer respect.


There was also the episode "The Big Departure" which aired on March 7, 1968. (In case you're curious, in Dragnet's four seasons "big" was included in 19 other episode titles.) Again, this clip is timeless as so much of it can be applied to today.


Thanks, Joe, for being on duty.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Like Miley Cyrus, We've All Given Lap Dances

"Wait, what? Miley Cyrus? Gave who a lap dance? And what do you mean? I've never given anyone a lap dance!" Oh, the questions you must have. Let's start from the beginning. Last year, Miley Cyrus - the cute, precocious teen, celebrity daughter of Billy Ray Cyrus, a.k.a. Hannah Montana, and Disney child star - began slipping into teenage rebellion when she quit Twitter. Yet, Miley didn't just quit tweeting or cancel her account. She also wrote a rap song about it.

Risks Of Being Vulnerable

Being vulnerable can be so rewarding. It can also be horrifically disappointing. Stereotypically for guys, being vulnerable with thoughts and feelings is simply against a man's nature. It doesn't come naturally. Emotions are saved for when men are alone or to share only with spouses or best friends. I think of the Tom Hanks line from  A League of Their Own : "There's no crying in baseball!" Anger seems to be permitted but not fear, worry, or tears. More often I've seen people apologize for getting upset or tearing up than for showing an angry or passionate reaction.  The more reflective emotions seem to be reserved for women. It seems stereotypically more natural for women to be shedding tears or showing concern. Yet, too much or too frequent emotional displays can also bring scoffing or ridicule. It's like there's no winning when it comes to being vulnerable. This is why being vulnerable is hard and requires intentionality.  The reality is that be

Pour Life Into One Another

I stumbled across this video clip and this is why I love the internet! I never know on any given day what morsel of wisdom, encouragement, hilarity, or entertainment will be found. This clip is from Angel-A, a French fantasy romantic drama film. What's unique about this video is that a man is being forced to examine himself and see his value. This something I think most people, especially guys, have difficulty doing.