Skip to main content

Squirrel! Part 2: Well, Swell

Ever fallen from a ladder? It's a surreal experience. After spending time making certain the ladder was on solid ground outside my house, I carefully ascended it while confirming balance and stability. When I reached two steps from the yellow top of the six-footer, I stabilized myself further and began shooting hornet spray into an opening just beneath our townhome's roof. Sufficiently saturating the opening and hopefully interior of the breech where the evil squirrel had taken up residence, I began to make my decent.

Then, it happened. The ladder was on the corner of my neighbor's stoop. It must've shifted just enough to tilt to the side. Maybe it slipped off the stoop. I didn't process those details. In a split second, I knew there was no stabilizing the ladder nor could I hold onto the awning over my neighbor's door. Whether the words came out of my mouth, I at least thought, "Lord, help!"

In slow motion, I fell. So many people say similar incidents happen in slow motion. They really do! I recall thinking, "When am I going to hit the ground?" It actually seemed to take longer than expected. Meanwhile, I was basically riding the ladder down at least half way before falling to the ground.

Impact. The crash took out 3 snowmen lights guarding our little flower box area beneath the front window. A portion of the cement edgers for the flower box was knocked flat. I sprang to my feet with the weird mental rush that I hoped no one saw the incident and that I needed to get up quickly to convey that I was alright. How silly to think that before even assessing my damage. Pride kicked in immediately.

Nothing felt broken or mangled. Then, my eyes locked on my right hand. The top portion between the knuckles and wrist was swollen a purplish-red-blue and clearly raised. I wiggled all my fingers without much pain but I wasn't sure if my hand was broken or at least fractured. I collected the ladder to take inside and noticed the folding arm on the right was warped. Repairable, but confirmation of the direction the ladder fell.

Keeping an ice pack on top of right hand reduced the discoloration and some of the swelling. This wasn't one of those moments to wait and see or tough it out. This needed to be X-rayed. Going to Patient's First in Columbia probably wasn't the best option as it took me three hours from the time I checked in until I left with a splint. However, going to the Emergency Room at Howard General seemed extreme and could've taken just as long.

The X-rays showed no breaks or fractures and the doctor praised my putting ice on the injury so quickly. He determined the injury was a hematoma but recommended an aluminum splint for some added comfort and some Ibuprofen.

My record for no broken bones remains...unbroken. I'm very blessed to not have injured myself more severely. However, the bruising and soreness is setting in as I have a a bruise on my right collar bone and a sore right bum. Seems like the right of me took the most beating!

Today, the breech in the roof was sealed. Victory is mine. Time for some egg nog.


Also, check out:


Comments

  1. Yikes! Glad to hear nothing is broken. That damn squirrel has been nothing but trouble!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

May We Never Forget

On this 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, I'm posting below a story I wrote on the 10th anniversary. These are my reflections on that day.  Looking at the first paragraph, it's interesting how times change. No one has asked me questions of where I was or what I was doing. I'm not sure if many of us have forgotten but more likely we're so very distracted. We've navigated almost two years of a pandemic that's taken and changed so many lives. We've navigated political and cultural changes poorly and emotionally to the point of creating more divisions.  We are not the country we were the weeks and months after 9/11. The bipartisan efforts then were refreshing. The amount of American flags flying proudly and in solidarity was inspiring. Today, it seems many despise their own country and its flag. But even this is not new. While she has stumbled over the years and will continue to do so - America will always be the most amazing country in the world. It

Risks Of Being Vulnerable

Being vulnerable can be so rewarding. It can also be horrifically disappointing. Stereotypically for guys, being vulnerable with thoughts and feelings is simply against a man's nature. It doesn't come naturally. Emotions are saved for when men are alone or to share only with spouses or best friends. I think of the Tom Hanks line from  A League of Their Own : "There's no crying in baseball!" Anger seems to be permitted but not fear, worry, or tears. More often I've seen people apologize for getting upset or tearing up than for showing an angry or passionate reaction.  The more reflective emotions seem to be reserved for women. It seems stereotypically more natural for women to be shedding tears or showing concern. Yet, too much or too frequent emotional displays can also bring scoffing or ridicule. It's like there's no winning when it comes to being vulnerable. This is why being vulnerable is hard and requires intentionality.  The reality is that be

Grateful During Unemployment

Two years have passed since I last scribed in this blog. Much life has transpired during that time. Too much to really unpack here. Then, I was a few months into a new public sector role with the City of Baltimore and starting to pursue the dream of rebooting the paranormal broadcast TV news series I co-created with Darren Dedo called "Unexplained" as a YouTube docu-series "Unexplained Cases."  Today, I am unemployed and "Unexplained Cases" has grown but has yet to generate revenue.  In July, I was dismissed from both my part-time weekend job at Grace Community Church and my City of Baltimore job. I've never had the pleasure of being released from two jobs in a month. Technically, I was released in June from Grace and my separation date was July 3. My last day of work at Baltimore was July 23 and my separation date was September 23. Unless one has been through an extended period of unemployment, one cannot understand the emotions that are stirred. For